Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Fact of the Day’ Category

I worked a full day of whale watches on Wednesday, and truthfully it was one of those fluke (no pun intended) days where there was not a lot of activity.  I did a double that day, which means that I headed over to the dinner cruise after whale watches.  A cow/calf came over to our boat and there was something strange in the water.  It looked like there might have been two babies in the water with the cow.  If that were the case, this would have been something very rare.  After watching the whales for a minute, it was apparent that there wasn’t not a second calf, but rather the mom had a right angle curve on the right side of her tail.  It was really weird.

We were trying to figure out what type of circumstances could have led to the fluke being shaped this way.  Any guesses? It was only the right side and looked like the picture of the plane wing I have here.  Now what made this encounter even better was that as soon as the female showed her tail, she dove down and breached 20 feet from our boat! I think she was trying to prove her tail still works, even though it was odd looking!

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

When cows are nursing their newborns, they produce between 100-150 gallons of milk each day, allowing the calf to gain 100 pounds per day.  The milk has a 50% fat content and is thick, about the consistency of cottage cheese.  I have read reports comparing whale milk to “krill flavored cheese.” Gross.

Read Full Post »

Baby Humpbacks are born weighing 1 and 1/2 tons.  Scientists believe that the female whales are larger because of the enormity of their calves.  They need to be larger to carry a calf safely to term.

Read Full Post »

Aren’t you hungry?

The Maui Nui Basin is known for its beautiful, sparkling, crystal blue water.  Unfortunately for the humpbacks, such warm water also means less nutrients.  When a body of water has fewer nutrients it can only support less complex eco-systems, meaning that there are  no large schools of fish.  This is primarily what humpback whales feed on: large schools of small fish.

From the time our humpbacks begin their migration, until they return to Alaska, they do not feed.  It is roughly three months round trip, and females will typically lose 1/3 of their body weight by the time they return to the Alaskan waters!

Read Full Post »

Female humpbacks are larger than males.  The females grow to be 50 feet in length while males are closer to 40 feet.

Read Full Post »